Friday, September 21, 2018

1878 - How a Hat Saved a Life

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

1784 - September 21 - The Nation's First Daily Newspaper Began Publication
The nation's first daily newspaper, the Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, began publication on September 21, 1784. Many independent newspapers ran before that on a weekly or monthly basis. America's first independent newspaper, the New England Courant, was published by Benjamin Franklin's older brother in 1721. By the start of the Revolutionary War in 1775, there were 37 independent... Read MORE...

www.americaslibrary.gov
September 21, 1784
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"BUHACH" The Great California Insect Powder
Marlborough, Massachusetts, USA (Marlboro)

1827 - ACCIDENT.
In Marlborough on Wednesday last, as the workmen were raising the frame of a building designed for an Academy and Masonic Hall, an accident occurred of very painful consequences. When the whole frame except the roof had been raised, there were eleven persons standing on the roof. In this situation, the support of the beam gave way, and the beam broke and fell, precipitating the whole eleven into... Read MORE...

Salem Gazette -  Salem, Massachusetts -  September 21, 1827
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Belchertown, Massachusetts, USA

1843 - Giant Cow
Ira Fenton, of Belchertown, Mass., has raised a Durham cow, which is now eight years old, and weighs 1740 pounds. On the 29th of May she brought a calf, and the owner had the curiosity to measure her bag, it was two feet in depth, two feet in length, and eighteen inches in width! The calf was then put upon one side, and 90 pounds of milk taken from the other side at the same time. After the calf... Read MORE...

genealogybank.com
Emancipator -  New York -  September 21, 1843
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Auburn, New York, USA

1870 - Boiler Explosion at Auburn - A Building Demolished and One Man Killed
AUBURN, N. Y., Sept. 20. - The steam boiler in T. R. STALKER's planing-mill exploded at 6 o'clock this morning completely demolishing the large brick building in which it was located, and badly damaging other buildings in the immediate vicinity. The foreman having charge of the engine was buried in the ruins, and taken out dead, being scalded from head to foot. His name was JAMES HAMILTON. The... Read MORE...

The New York Times -  New York, New York -  September 21, 1870
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1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes

Rice Waffles - Beat together a pint of milk, the yolks of three eggs, two ounces of butter and half a teacup of thoroughly boiled rice, sprinkle a little salt and a half teaspoonful of soda into a pint of flour, and then sift it in. Beat thoroughly and bake in waffle irons.

The Willimantic Chronicle, Willimantic, Conn., January 5, 1881
Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

1878 - A Little Traveler
The passengers by the through Intercolonial train from St. John, N.B. to Montreal, which arrived at Bonaventure Station this morning, was very much interested in a little girl about seven years of age, who was traveling alone, friends having placed her aboard the train at St. John on Tuesday night, and left her to the tender mercies of passengers. She was very neatly dressed, and had a white... Read MORE...

St Joseph Herald -  Saint Joseph, Michigan -  September 21, 1878
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Utica, New York, USA

1878 - How a Hat Saved a Life
MAJ. RUBE ALLEN, Com. Vanderbilt's favorite veteran engineer of the Central Road, a man of giant stature, with a brave heart, which is as tender as a woman's, had a new hat for one of the freight brakeman of the road when he can find the right man. One day last week he was coming to Utica, drawing an express train. Just as he approached one of the small stations he saw the foreman of a section... Read MORE...

St Joseph Herald -  Saint Joseph, Michigan -  September 21, 1878
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New Vineyard, Maine, USA

1886  September 21 - Three Deaths at New Vineyard

FARMINGTON, Sept. 20. Capt. Leonard Hackett, eighty-five years old, Hannah Wilcox, sixty-five, and Jonathan Look, jr., aged forty-four, all died Saturday in the neighboring town of New Vineyard, suddenly. The first named was one of the oldest citizens in town and had been a member of the Legislature at one time.

Bangor Daily Whig and Courier -  Bangor, Maine -  September 21, 1886
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Springfield, Massachusetts, USA (Indian Orchard)

1893  September 21 - First Gasoline-Powered Automobile

The first successful gasoline-powered automobile was perfected by Charles and Frank Duryea in Springfield. September 21 – Brothers Charles and Frank Duryea drive the first gasoline-powered motorcar in America on public roads in Springfield, Massachusetts.

www.e-referencedesk.com/ resources/state-history-timeline/ massachusetts.html
September 21, 1893
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1800s Advice and Etiquette for Ladies

Dress for Morning Visits — A lady should never receive her morning callers in a wrapper, unless they call at an unusually early hour, or some unexpected demand upon her time makes it impossible to change her dress after breakfast. On the other hand, an elaborate costume before dinner is in excessively bad taste.

The Ladies" Book of Etiquette, and Manual of Politeness: A Complete Handbook for the Use of the Lady in Polite Society... by Florence Hartley, January 1, 1872
Berlin, New Hampshire, USA (Maynesborough)

1896 - Big Plant is Burned
Berlin, N. H. Sept. 21 - The lumber mills, cabinet factory, grist mills and considerable lumber, owned by the Berlin Manufacturing company, were destroyed by fire Saturday night. The burned buildings covered a large area the railroad depot. A large number of men will be thrown out of employment. The loss is about $50,000, and is partially covered by insurance. The fire caught near the engine... Read MORE...

The Fitchburg Sentinel -  Fitchburg, Massachusetts -  September 21, 1896
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Oswego, New York, USA

1896  Big Blaze at Oswego.

OSWEGO, N. Y., Sept. 21. - At an early hour yesterday morning fire destroyed the entire plants of the Silver Metal company and the Seliger Toothill Novelty company, together with the three-story block of Timoth Donovan and the houses of Patrick Murray and William Grant. The loss will probably aggregate $100,000. Two hundred and fifty hands are thrown out of employment.

North Adams Transcript -  North Adams, Massachusetts -  September 21, 1896
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Clinton, Massachusetts, USA

1896 - Dynamite Exploded in Water-Works Aqueduct at Clinton
FOUR MEN KILLED, ONE BADLY HURT.
Dynamite Exploded in Water-Works Aquaduct at Clinton.

Four men were killed and one was fatally injured by an explosion of dynamite in the tunnel of shaft No. 2. Metropolitan water-works aqueduct, at Clinton, Saturday afternoon. The dead are ANDREW KELLY, 35, of Jersey City; JAMES PERRY, colored, 30, of North Carolina; SPENCER BURDEN, colored, 30, of... Read MORE...

The Fitchburg Sentinel -  Fitchburg, Massachusetts -  September 21, 1896
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Manhattan, New York, USA (New York City) (New Amsterdam)

1897 - September 21 – Francis P. Church responds to a letter to the editor that is known as the famous "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus" letter. (wikipedia)
"DEAR EDITOR: I am 8 years old.
"Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus.
"Papa says, 'If you see it in THE SUN it's so.'
"Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus?

"VIRGINIA O'HANLON.
"115 WEST NINETY-FIFTH STREET."

VIRGINIA, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except they see. They... Read MORE...

The Sun -  New York, New York -  September 21, 1897
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1938 - Sept. 21 - The Great Hurricane brought terror to large parts of New England and Long Island
A great hurricane smashed into Long Island and bisected New England causing a massive forest blow down and widespread flooding. Winds gusted to 186 mph at Blue Hill MA, and a storm surge of nearly thirty feet caused extensive flooding along the coast of Rhode Island. The hurricane killed 600 persons and caused 500 million dollars damage. The hurricane, which lasted twelve days, destroyed 275... Read MORE...

WeatherForYou.com
September 21, 1938
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1938 - Sept. 21 - The Great Hurricane brought terror to large parts of New England.
A great hurricane smashed into Long Island and bisected New England causing a massive forest blow down and widespread flooding. Winds gusted to 186 mph at Blue Hill MA, and a storm surge of nearly thirty feet caused extensive flooding along the coast of Rhode Island. The hurricane killed 600 persons and caused 500 million dollars damage. The hurricane, which lasted twelve days, destroyed 275... Read MORE...

WeatherForYou.com
September 21, 1938
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1875  September - Twelve inches of snow fell Friday, at Riviere du Loup, P. Q., doing great damage to fruit and shade trees.


St. Albans Daily Messenger
St. Albans, Vermont

1947  September 17–September 21 – The 1947 Fort Lauderdale Hurricane in southeastern Florida, and also in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana causes widespread damage and kills 51 people.

www.wikipedia.org

America - Did you know? Inches, Teaspoons and a Ton of Bricks: It"s perfectly acceptable to use the metric system in the United States - Congress originally authorized it in 1866 and has repeated those sentiments in the years since - but tradition tells a whole other tale. Although the government now requires metric use in some public sectors and strongly encourages it in many private industries, the American public never really took to the system and largely dismissed it, making the United States the only industrialized nation where that"s the case. In an effort to move the matter along, Congress even passed a Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and set up a U.S. Metric Board to take care of all the planning for the desired transition, but they apparently didn"t empower the board with enough authority, and the American people essentially said, "meh" to adopting metric and continued on with their miles, pounds, ounces and all the rest. Similarly lackluster efforts since then have done little to get Americans to change their ways.

people.howstuffworks.com


Quebec - Did you know? In New France, a seigneur"s home was sometimes built of timber but more often of stone, with dimensions rarely exceeding twenty feet by forty, it was not much more pretentious than the homes of the more prosperous and thrifty among the seigneur"s dependents. Its three or four spacious rooms were, however, more comfortably equipped with furniture which in many cases had been brought from France.

Daily Life in New France (www.chroniclesofamerica.com/ french/ daily_life_in_new_france.htm)

1909 advertisement

Follow the Leader and Get the Facts
A Daily Newspaper with News in it
The Newburyport Leader
39 Inn Street
Newburyport, Mass.

Kensington, New Hampshire, sketches and reminiscences by Mace, Ida M Published 1909
Died September 21

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