Sunday, September 30, 2018

1897 - BIG BREWERY BURNED

Canaan, Connecticut, USA

1858  Accident

At Canaan, Ct., on the 17th, a bright little boy of eight years, son of Edwin Ives, while playing about his father's factory, was caught in a belt, and instantly carried over a shaft revolving with great velocity, horribly mangling his body. He lived but two hours after the accident.

genealogybank.com
Sun -  Massachusetts -  September 30, 1858
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"1847 Rogers Bros."
The Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden, Conn.

The Ladies' Home Journal
March 1898
Sorel, Qu├ębec, Canada

1875 - PERILS OF THE RAIL
Frightful Casualty in Canada - Eleven Persons Killed and Twenty-five Wounded.

SOREL, Quebec, September 29 - About 7 o'clock last night a train coming from Yamaska run over an obstruction supposed to have been maliciously placed across the track. Six platform cars, upon which there were about seventy laborers, were in front and the engine in the rear and running at a fair speed. Two or three... Read MORE...

The Times -  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania -  September 30, 1875
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La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA (LaCrosse)

1897 - BIG BREWERY BURNED.
LaCrosse, Wis., Sept. 21. - Early Thursday morning fire was discovered in the roof of the brew house of the John Gund Brewing company's plant.
The malt house contained several car loads of malt and about 5,000 bushels of barley, which was totally destroyed, and the office building, which stands across the street, was not burned, and a part of the engine-room was also saved. The cold storage... Read MORE...

Iowa State Reporter -  Waterloo, Iowa -  September 30, 1897
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1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes

Cream Cheese - Put three pints of milk to a half pint of cream, warm and put in a little rennett; keep it covered in a warm place till it is curdled, then put it in a mould with holes in it and drain about an hour. Serve with cream and sugar.

The Willimantic Chronicle, Willimantic, Conn., July 12, 1882
Meriden, Connecticut, USA

1903 - Silver Workers Make Demands
Meriden, Conn., Sept. 30. - A demand for a nine hour day with ten hours' pay has been presented at all the factories of the International Silver company in this city and elsewhere, and it is understood that a similar demand has been made or will be made on every silver shop in the United States and Canada. In addition to the nine hour demand an allowance of "time and a half" for overtime work is... Read MORE...

Pittston Gazette -  Pittston, Pennsylvania -  September 30, 1903
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Murray & Lanman's Florida Water

To the rich and to the poor,
To all people of taste,
at home,
on ship board,
at the seaside,
in the mountains.

No article will afford so much pleasure or contribute so largely to comfort as Murray & Lanman's Florida Water...
Melrose, Massachusetts, USA

1904 - KILLED IN TROLLEY CRASH Half a Score Dead and Many More Injured by Explosion.
DYNAMITE CAUSES DISASTER

Car Runs Into Box of High Explosive in Boston Which Had Dropped From a Truck Onto the Track - Concussion Felt at Great Distance - Crowd of Three Thousand Gathers at Spot.

Boston, Mass. - By the explosion of a fifty-pound box of dynamite under a crowded trolley car in Melrose, a suburb of this city, six persons were killed outright - among them a woman and her child... Read MORE...

The Cranbury Press -  New Jersey -  September 30, 1904
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Pensacola, Florida, USA

1906 - DELUGE FOLLOWS FATAL HURRICANE; USE STREET BOATS. THIRTY KNOWN DEAD NEAR PENSACOLA, WITH LOSS OF $8,000,000.
Pensacola, Fla., (via Flomaton, Ala., by courier)
Sept. 29. - Flood followed hurricane wind, and rain this morning, and the city tonight is nearly submerged. Seven and one-half inches of rain fell in a little over three hours and the main streets of the city were turned into veritable rivers by this tremendous downpour. In some instances the water is shoulder deep. First floor cellars and many... Read MORE...

Washington Times -  Washington, D.C. -  September 30, 1906
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1935 - September 30 - Roosevelt Dedicates Boulder Dam (later to be known as Hoover Dam)
Government Spending Is To Be Ended
Private Industry Mus Now Maintain Recovery Pay Says F.R.

by Frederick A. Storm
United Press White House Correspondent

BOULDER DAM, Nev., Sept. 30 (U.P.) - Government spending has created the purchasing power - now it is up to private industry to maintain the recovery pace set by the New Deal, President Roosevelt told the nation today.

The 108,000,000... Read MORE...

The Daily Herald -  Provo, Utah -  September 30, 1935
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1800s Advice and Etiquette for Ladies

Avoid making any noise in eating, even if each meal is eaten in solitary state. It is a disgusting habit, and one not easily cured if once contracted, to make any noise with the lips when eating.

The Ladies" Book of Etiquette, and Manual of Politeness: A Complete Handbook for the Use of the Lady in Polite Society... by Florence Hartley, January 1, 1872
1970 - September 30 - A nineteen month drought in southern California came to a climax.
The drought, which made brush and buildings tinder dry, set up the worst fire conditions in California history as hot Santa Anna winds sent the temperature soaring to 105 degrees at Los Angeles, and to 97 degrees at San Diego. During that last week of September whole communities of interior San Diego County were consumed by fire. Half a million acres were burned, and the fires caused fifty... Read MORE...

WeatherForYou.com
September 30, 1970
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1876  Earthquake
A distinct shock of earthquake was felt on the 22d at New Bedford, Fairhaven and Dartmouth, Massachusetts.

Arizona Weekly Citizen
Tucson, Arizona

1882  In order to provide electricity to the paper industry, the nation's first hydro-electric central station, the Vulcan Street Plant on the Fox River, began operation on September 30, 1882. (Appleton, Wisconsin)



America - Did you know? December 15, 1791 - First ten amendments to the Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights, are ratified.

www.infoplease.com


Quebec - Did you know? In New France, the habitant"s homes were commonly built of felled timber or of rough-hewn stone, solid, low, stocky buildings, usually about twenty by forty feet or thereabouts in size, with a single doorway and very few windows. The roofs were steep-pitched, with a dormer window or two thrust out on either side, the eaves projecting well over the walls in such manner as to give the structures a half-bungalow appearance. With almost religious punctuality the habitants whitewashed the outside of their walls every spring, so that from the river the country houses looked trim and neat at all seasons.

Daily Life in New France (www.chroniclesofamerica.com/ french/ daily_life_in_new_france.htm)

Rhea, Smalley & Co.,
Wholesale Dealers in All Kinds of Farm Machinery
226 S. Washington and 120 Liberty Sts., Peoria, Ill.
Died September 30

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