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Sunday, November 21, 2010

1884 - A VERY STRANGE STORY.

 A Woman Returns to Life While on a Dissecting Table.

cemetery
SPRINGFIELD, Mass., Dec 10. - A strange story has come from Egremont, among the Berkshire hills, near the New-York line. The town and the surrounding villages are in great excitement.  The story runs that Estelle Newman, about 30 years old, died in Egremont in 1878, and, after the funeral service in the little Methodist church was buried in the town cemetery and forgotten. The sensation comes from the dying testimony of H. Worth Wright, in Connecticut, who is said to have confessed to his brother that he, being a student in the Albany Medical College, was present at the funeral with other students, lay in wait near the cemetery till the burial was over and the graveyard was deserted, and then helped disinter the body and carry it in a sack to the medical college. They at once went to work on it in the dissecting room. While on the table the body showed signs of life, and was resuscitated by the students. Finding the woman alive on their hands the authorities of the college had her taken to an insane asylum in Schoharie County, N. Y. This is the last that Wright is said to have known of her whereabouts. The Newman woman's grave will probably be opened to see what the story amounts to.

The New York Times
New York, New York
December 11, 1884

Friday, November 19, 2010

November 21 News - 1900 - Rhode Island Turkey for the President

Welcome to our blog, where we embark on a captivating journey through time, exploring the rich tapestry of history and genealogy.  In this edition, we'll delve into the treasure trove of historical news articles dated November 21, unearthing stories that resonate with genealogists and history enthusiasts alike.  From local happenings to global events, we'll uncover the stories that shaped the lives of our ancestors, providing valuable insights for those on a quest to discover their roots.  So, grab your magnifying glass and step into the past as we unravel the November 21 historical headlines that may hold the missing pieces of your family's history puzzle.
    Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada (Port La-Joie, Isle-St-Jean, Acadia)

    1911 - They've Found What Might Be a Sea Serpant's Bones


    Charlottetown, P.E.I., Nov. 20 - Bones of a strange animal found at Grand Tracadie Beach are so unfamiliar and puzzling to residents here, that they will be place in the hands of a scientist to determine the identity of the strange skeleton.

    Some scientists who have seen the animal believe that it may be the remains of a sea-serpent. It is thought that the find, which was caused by that shifting of the sasnd during the recent heay gale, may prove of great historic interest. The animal... Read MORE...

    Winston-Salem Journal -  Winston-Salem, North Carolina -  November 21, 1911
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    UNDERTAKING
    John Solleder & Co.

    NEW DOUBLE HEARSE

    Toronto

    January 18, 1870

    The Irish Canadian, Toronto, Ontario, Wednesday, March 30, 1870

    Visit Toronto, Ontario, Canada (York)!

    Southbridge, Massachusetts, USA (Globe) (Lensdale) (Saundersdale) (Shuttleville)

    1901 - Nearly $600,000. Amount Paid in Wages Annually By Southbridge Firms. Importance and Vastness of the Business of Optical Goods Manufactures.


    George W. Wells, Head of the American Optical Company, Says the Proposed French Reciprocity Treaty Would be a Menace to the Industry.

    Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, in his much-talked-of reciprocity speech before the Middlesex club, recently, said that in the opinon of those interested in the manufacture of optical goods at Southbridge, the adoption of the new French reciprocity treaty would be a great danger to this industry.

    Comparatively few people in Massachusetts know that in the town of ... Read MORE...

    The Boston Globe -  Boston, Massachusetts -  Thu, November 21, 1901
    Comments


     

    1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes



    Potato Chips - Peel a raw potato as apples are peeled, let the parings be as near as possible the same thickness, and let them be as long as possible; dry them thoroughly in a cloth, put them in the frying-basket and plunge it in boiling hot...Read MORE...



    The Willimantic Chronicle, Willimantic, Conn., May 11, 1881

    Ossawn Mills Co., Norwich, Conn., 1898
    Manufacturers of Bicycle Lacing Cord and Dress Guard Nets, Crown Hangers, Franklin Hooks, Brass and Steel Picture Hooks, Picture Wire, Shade Cords, Solid Braided Cords, Clothes-lines, Chalk-lines, Picture and Shade Hardware, Drapery Pins, Gilt Nails, Bright Wire Goods, Spool Wire, Flower Wire, &c., &c.
    museumofcthistory.org

    Visit Norwich, Connecticut, USA (Norwichtown) (Yantic) (Greeneville) (Occum) (Taftville)!

    Westerly, Rhode Island, USA (Watch Hill) (Misquamicut)

    1900 - TURKEY FOR THE PRESIDENT - A Rhode Island Bird Picked Out for Thanksgiving at the White House


    PROVIDENCE, R. I. The Westerly turkey king has picked out the turkey which it is expected will grace President McKinley's table at the White House on Thanksgiving Day. The turkey is a magnificent-looking gobbler and is now strutting around showing its pride in its 35 pounds of superiority. The bird was selected after a careful inspection of every flock in the neighborhood of Westerly and North Stonington.

    The fame of the town of Westerly rests upon the fact that for years and years it has... Read MORE...

    The Reading Eagle -  Reading, Pennsylvania -  November 21, 1900
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    1902  November 21 - 1st night football game, Philadelphia Athletics beats Kanaweola AC, 39-0

    onthisday.com

    Visit Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA!

    1847  November 21 - Steamer "Phoenix" is lost on Lake Michigan, kills 200

    onthisday.com

    Visit , Michigan, USA!

    1922  November 21 – Rebecca Felton of Georgia takes the oath of office, becoming the first woman United States Senator.

    wikipedia.org

    Visit , Georgia, USA!

    1868  A man in Monson, Mass., has an apple tree which bears this year about two barrels of apples, half of which are Baldwins, and the other half of the Russet variety, interspersed on each limb in just about equal proportions.


    St Joseph Herald
    Saint Joseph, Michigan

    Visit Monson, Massachusetts, USA!

     

    America - Did you know?

     Alaska’s coastline is longer than all other 49 states’ coastlines combined.

     

    Quebec - Did you know?

     Quebec has the oldest English language newspaper in North America.

    Despite being a French speaking province, Quebec City is home to the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph, a weekly English language newspaper. It was founded in 1764, making it the oldest...Read MORE...



    everything-everywhere.com
     

    Picture of the Day



    Visit Marlow, New Hampshire, USA!

    Discover the people who lived there, the places they visited and the stories they shared.


    Village Pond

    Landers, Frary & Clark, Manufacturers of Cutlery and Harware, 1893
    museumofcthistory.org

    Visit New Britain, Connecticut, USA!

    Died November 21



    Read MORE...

    Wednesday, November 17, 2010

    Happy Thanksgiving! 1888 - Norwich, CT style!

     NO END OF FUN. How the Norwich, Conn.,  Boys Celebrate Thanksgiving.  
    They Go About the Town Gathering Barrels, and Then After the Turkey is Eaten What a Thanksgiving Bonfire They Have.

    ROAST turkey and fixin's!

    Phew!

    Take a run around New England and ask all the boys you meet what they think of it. Whisper Thanksgiving in their ear and hear them howl. When you come to Norwich - that quaint Connecticut town - what will the boys tell you there!

    "Roast turkey and fixin's," you will say, and the boys will look at you and grin. Then you go up to them softly and whisper Thanksgiving - and then:

    "Barrels!"

    That's what it is. Barrels. Turkey first and barrels afterward.

    As early as the first day of October the Norwich boy begins to make plans for Thanksgiving day, and his first and central fancy turns to barrels. From that time on to the festival no man's barrel is safe in Norwich.

    An evil spirit seems to possess it. If a boy passes it in the soberest style in the world, if he so much as casts one coquetting sidelong glance that way, instantly the barrel begins to dance and rattle, and if no one is watching and the youngster rubs up against it, it gives a sudden hop, topples over on its side and scurries away. Of course the boy has to follow it to kick it straight when it gets askew on its rumbling course and to keep it from prancing against pedestrians; and it invariably happens that the boy has to drive it into its lair before it will submit to government. There is little use of attempting to control a barrel after it has contracted the Thanksgiving fever, and the owner looks forward resignedly to its inevitable desertion from him. It looks very singular to a stranger coming into this town at this season of the year to see barrels rolling off in every direction, and the staid citizens skipping nimbly and good humoredly out of the way of the procession. He cannot account for the phenomenon.

    Perhaps he is curious enough to try and find out. But the Norwich boy is up to snuff.

    "Say, sonny," the stranger asks, "what's up! Where are you going with all these barrels?"

    And the boy replies, innocently:
    "Nothin's up, mister. The barrel don't b'long to nobody or nothin'. Found it loose up the street and run it in. Say, there, Jimmy, give her a lift. Let her go, Gallagher!"

    And with a whoop the whole company are off, kicking the whirling things swiftly into the darkness of a side street.

    These youngsters are systematic.

    The work of collecting the booty is marked from the opening of the campaign to its finish by thorough discipline and organization and a hearty respect for the rights of each squad. First, all the boys in town array themselves into about a dozen independent brigades, and each force is duly empowered to look after the barrels in its own precinct, and an unwritten law that is at least 200 years old forbids the bands to trespass on territory not assigned to them. The largest squads are thus placed: One at Bean Hill, the ancestral home of President Cleveland, whose grandfather was a barrel burner; one at Norwich Town, two at the Falls, two at the West Side, one at Jail Hill, in the center of the city, one at Laurel Hill, one at Greenville, and the rest are scattered about in the suburbs. Each band has a hiding place for its collection, called the "Home Base," and to each it is assigned the hill on which the stacks are to be burned. The preliminary arrangements completed, the boys go to work with a will to get their barrels together.

    Suppose they had to do this. How they would growl.

    The custom of burning bonfires on Thanksgiving night is peculiar to this town, and its origin is lost in the obscurity of early colonial tradition. It was old when Benedict Arnold was a boy, and into the sport he entered with characteristic impetuosity and willfulness. It is mentioned in the first chronicles of Norwich; and Miss Culkins, a local historian, describes a fiery encounter between Benedict and a solemn constable who undertook to rob him of his barrel, in which Arnold stripped off his coat and dared the big man to fight. Many attempts have been made by local antiquarians to trace the custom to its source, but vainly; the only plausible explanation essays to connect it with a practice that prevailed in the hill towns of the Massachusetts colony of burning brush fires early in November to celebrate the miscarriage of the Guy Fawkes gunpowder plot. It was suspected that as Thanksgiving was appointed at that period at about Nov. 5 the custom attached itself to Thanksgiving, after its original intent was lost, and that it was imported into this town by the first settlers a little after the middle of the Seventeenth century.

    But the Massachusetts rite differs importantly from the Norwich spirit in that brush was burned instead of barrel stacks. There is nothing unique about brush bonfires, which were common among the ancient Britons and Scots, but a barrel fire is an elaborate and startling creation, a product of the juvenile genius of ancient Norwich.

    Boys, think of it. Think of hunting, hunting for days together, for barrels. Think of the work, and it takes work. But then, it's great fun, you say.

    So it is.

    To make a lofty and successful barrel bonfire demands native tact, talent and constructive abilities. The first thing to do is to get the pole about which the barrels are to be strung like giant beads, and this usually is cut and peeled a few days before the forthcoming ceremony. A slim, straight hickory, free from knots, and not less than fifty or sixty feet high is selected in the forest, and, after it has been trimmed and denuded of its bark, it is trailed into town at the heels of a dozen sturdy boys. On Thanksgiving day morning it is drawn to the apex of the hill on which it is to do duty, whereon scores of citizens have gathered to lend a hand in erecting the staff or furnish the necessary advisory remarks to the workers.

    The barrels are quickly hung about the pole, and then comes the hard and delicate task of lifting it into the dug hole which has already been prepared for it. With long ropes and steadying guys, a hundred eager hands to help, the great hollow stack goes slowly up, the barrels creaking and rumbling loosely about its staff, and the pole is left swaying threateningly at the toiling pigmies at its base. At last it reaches the balancing point, slips easily into the cavity with a heavy muffled "kerplump," and the worst of the struggle is over. The loose earth about the rim of the hole is shoveled in and tamped solidly down, and the boys and spectators walk off six rods and inspect the structure. Next cans of kerosene are emptied over the bottom barrels; shavings, saturated with oil, are piled inside; a few parting pats and shakes bring refractory barrels into position, and make the funnel straight and symmetrical, and then everything is ready for the evening fun.

    And what fun! The boys can hardly wait in patience for the coming of dusk. But it comes at just the right time.

    It comes after the turkey is eaten. You know it's turkey first and barrels afterward. Poor fun it would be to watch a bonfire on an empty stomach. But think of stuffing yourself so full of turkey (it's allowable on Thanksgiving) till you almost feel as if you could gobble, and then going out and watching a nice big blaze on the hill. It usually comes about an hour and a half after dinner, when the lamps have hardly been lighted in the houses, the quiet, dusty street have barely grown gray in the obliterating twilight, and the four solemn faces of the big illuminated city hall clock glow like four dim moons through the tree tops. With a jubilant rush and yell the bands are off like the wind to the hilltops. Having reached the grabs each band forms in military array about its stack, the leader silently and with an air of conscious self importance advances to the bottom of the pile; he scratches a match on his trousers and applies the tiny torch tot he shavings, and ---

    Gracious! Did you ever seen anything like it?

    Instantly there is a flash as the oiled kindlings catch the flame; a great volume of dense black smoke belches up; then a magnificent gush of fire that reddens the whole hillside and the faces of the excited company wells up the tall column, and the conflagration is off. The combustion is furious, and the pillar of roaring flames, sparks and whirling smoke is a miniature cyclone on fire. The barrels writhe and twist, the staves gape asunder, and the bursting hoops leap out from the pile, as they come down, scatter sparks and glowing cinders on every side. The conflagration is too rapid to last long, and it is hardly two minutes after the match has been applied before the splendid pyre sinks from its soaring height a mass of shattered black embers, and the lurid brightness of the hillside gives place instantly to the impenetrable darkness. Barrel burning, though it is short lived, is the undiluted essence of intoxicating sport.

    The Norwich girls have a similar though tamer kind of sport with which to taper off the day's pleasures. As fashion forbids them to roll barrels and burn stacks, they collect spools instead, which they string on wires, arranging them in fanciful designs, squares, circles, pyramids and names, saturate the creations with oil or turpentine, and meet at the house of the leader of the band and burn them. Some of the devices are very ingenious or beautiful, and they make a brilliant though unpretentious bonfire.

    It's great, isn't it!

    Painesville Telegraph
    Painesville, Lake County, Ohio
    Nov 29, 1888


    For more stories about Norwich and the ancestors who lived there, visit Norwich, New London, Connecticut

    Wednesday, November 10, 2010

    May 12 News - 1858 - A very stupid game - Fatal Freak of a Boy

    Welcome to our blog, where we embark on a captivating journey through time, exploring the rich tapestry of history and genealogy.  In this edition, we'll delve into the treasure trove of historical news articles dated May 12, unearthing stories that resonate with genealogists and history enthusiasts alike.  From local happenings to global events, we'll uncover the stories that shaped the lives of our ancestors, providing valuable insights for those on a quest to discover their roots.  So, grab your magnifying glass and step into the past as we unravel the May 12 historical headlines that may hold the missing pieces of your family's history puzzle.
      Bakersfield, Vermont, USA

      1910 - BAKERSFIELD. Mrs. Matilda Doane, Oldest Woman in Town, Very Active.


      Mrs. Matlida Doane is visiting Willis Ross and George Giddings in East Bakersfield. It is a matter of great satisfaction to Mrs. Doane to be able to get around among her former friends again. She recently passed her 94th birthday anniversary which was celebrated by her friends sending her a shower of 248 post cards. These cards came from friends in six different states, from Maine to California, and also from Washington, D.C. Mrs. Doane has been a life long resident of Bakersfield coming here... Read MORE...

      St Albans Messenger -  St Albans, Vermont -  May 12, 1910
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      H. T. Morgan & Co's.
      Central Block
      Pittsfield, Mass.

      Visit Pittsfield, Massachusetts, USA (Coltsville)!

      1936 - May 12 – The Santa Fe railroad in the United States inaugurates the all-Pullman Super Chief passenger train between Chicago, Illinois and Los Angeles, California.


      NEW SANTA FE DIESEL 'CHIEF' TO START RUN

      Limited Begins 39-Hour Dash to Los Angeles From Chicago On Trip Tonight

      Operating on a schedule of 39 hours and 45 minutes, the Santa Fe's new Super Chief, powered with the Diesel locomotive, will leave Chicago tonight on its first run to the coast, arriving in San Bernadino at 7:30 a.m. Thursday.

      Effective Sunday, the Chief, drawn by steam locomotives, went on a 50 hour and 25 minute schedule for the Los Angeles to Chicago run.

      The Chief,... Read MORE...

      The San Bernadino County Sun -  San Bernadino, California -  May 12, 1936
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      1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes



      Mock Oyster Soup - Scrape twelve good-szied roots of oyster plants or salsify and throw them at once into cold water. Cut into thin slices, cover with one quart of water and cook gently for an hour, or until perfectly tender. Add a quart of...Read MORE...



      The Ladies' Home Journal, June 1898
      Amarillo, Texas, USA

      1929 - FIVE DEAD IN AMARILLO FIRE. SCORE ARE HURT WHEN OLD HOTEL IS DESTROYED IN EARLY MORNING BLAZE. ALL AVENUES OF ESCAPE ARE CUT OFF AND MANY ARE FORCED TO LEAP FROM THIRD STORY WINDOWS.


      (By The Associated Press.)
      Amarillo, May 11. - Trapped by flames which destroyed the Tourist hotel here early today, five men were burned to death, or killed when they jumped to the pavement from third story windows. Three of the victims were burned to death and two killed when they leaped. At least a score were injured, three seriously.

      The dead:
      PETER KEARNS, Pine, Colo.
      RAYMOND COZART, Detroit, Texas.
      HOYT CROWE, Tulia, Texas.
      J. P. PURDIAN, or PERDIAN, Amarillo.

      An Unidentified... Read MORE...

      Abilene Morning Reporter-News -  Abilene, Texas -  May 12, 1929
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      Paterson, New Jersey, USA

      1869 - Great Fire in Paterson.


      Mr. Michael Morris's warehouse, Paterson, and adjacent buildings were burned on Monday. The warehouse owned by Mr. Morris was used as a waste house. - The flames communicated with the Murray Mill, a superb brick building on Mill street, owned by Messrs. John Ryle & Co., as a silk manufactory. Day & Co., silk weavers, also occupied a part of the building. The flames spread rapidly and communicated with the tenement houses on each side and in the rear, and thence to the Murray Mill. After a short ... Read MORE...

      Daily State Gazette -  Trenton, New Jersey -  May 12, 1869
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      1800s Advice and Etiquette for Men



      It is very rude, when at the table, to scratch any part of your body. It is also very indecent to rub your teeth with the tablecloth or napkin; and to endeavour to pick them with your finger is more...Read MORE...



      Practical Morality, Or, A Guide to Men and Manners... (1813). United Kingdom: J. Walker.
      Taunton, Massachusetts, USA (East Taunton)

      1853 - ANOTHER FRIGHTFUL RAILROAD ACCIDENT.


      Saturday afternoon, as we learn from the Gazette, at half past two o'clock, as the New Bedford and Taunton train was about one mile and a half below Taunton, the axletree of the tender gave out, causing a succession of serious mishaps. The tender was immediately thrown down an embankment of thirty feet. The baggage car, directly behind, was precipitated below, on the right of the track, and also the succeeding car, in which were twenty-five passengers. All three were completely demolished. As... Read MORE...

      The Farmers' Cabinet -  Amherst, New Hampshire -  May 12, 1853
      Comments


      1780  May 12 - British capture Charleston, SC



      Visit Charleston, South Carolina, USA!

      1922  May 12 – A 20-ton meteorite lands near Blackstone, Virginia, USA.

      wikipedia.org

      Visit , Virginia, USA!

      1888  Chatham, Mass., May 10. - A heavy forest fire is raging in South Brewster and oding much damage to valuable wood land, also threatening small settlements lying in its track.


      St Joseph Herald
      Saint Joseph, Michigan

      Visit Brewster, Massachusetts, USA!

      1905  LIGHTNING STRUCK CIRCUS. One Man Killed and a Hundred Spectators Were Stunned.
      Special to the Washington Post Wheeling, W. Va., May 11 - In the midst of the performance of WALLACE'S circus at Marietta, Ohio this afternoon, lightning struck the main pole of the side show tent, killing WILLIAM TULLINS, of Lowell, seriously injuring four others, and stunning more than a hundred spectators.

      The Washington Post
      Washington, D.C.

      Visit Marietta, Ohio, USA!

      1853  Fire at Wilton.
      We learn from the Lowell News that on the 3d inst., a fire broke out in a building belonging to Dea. Fiske, and used for a cider mill and storage purposes. The building was entirely destroyed, together with a large quantity of lumber designed for the erection of a new house by Mr. Fiske. No insurance.

      The Farmers' Cabinet
      Amherst, New Hampshire

      Visit Wilton, Connecticut, USA!

      1853  Awful Railroad Accident. FIFTY PERSONS KILLED!
      NORWALK (CT) May 6. The 8 o'clock train for New York, ran off the draw-bridge into the river, near this place. One car was completely submerged and two others completely demolished. There has been a terrible loss of life. The excitement is so great that it is impossible to get a list of the killed or injured. The engine went through first, followed by two passengers cars. The 4th passenger car split in two, one half of which was thrown into the river, and the other half caught on the...
      Read MORE...


      The Farmers' Cabinet
      Amherst, New Hampshire

      Visit Norwalk, Connecticut, USA (Rowayton) (South Norwalk) (East Norwalk)!

      1858  Fatal Freak of a Boy
      In Middlesex, New York, on Wednesday afternoon, John R. Francisco, aged about fifteen years, went into a shed attached to his father's barn and suspended himself by the neck with a rope. He told some little children who were with him to run into the house as he was going to hang himself, and from this it is supposed that he did not intend to really commit suicide, but expected some one would come and release him. The father was nearly frantic with grief on finding his son dead.

      Alexandria Gazette
      Alexandria, Virginia

      Visit Middlesex, New York, USA!

       

      America - Did you know?

       The 30’s gangster Machine Gun Kelly gave the FBI the nickname “G-Men.”

       

      Quebec - Did you know?

       Saint-Jean-Vianney was originally created as a parish municipality in 1935, and became a village on December 29, 1951. By 1971, the village had a population of 1,266. On May 4, 1971, the village ceased to exist after half the town was pushed into a...Read MORE...



      wikipedia
       

      Picture of the Day



      Visit Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada!

      Discover the people who lived there, the places they visited and the stories they shared.


      Boulevard Queen - Queen Street

      Pittsfield Spark Coil Co.

      Visit Pittsfield, Massachusetts, USA (Coltsville)!

      Died May 12



      Read MORE...

      Tuesday, November 9, 2010

      August 26 News - 1869 - How Embarrassing is This? Seal Steals Man's Clothing

      Welcome to our blog, where we embark on a captivating journey through time, exploring the rich tapestry of history and genealogy.  In this edition, we'll delve into the treasure trove of historical news articles dated August 26, unearthing stories that resonate with genealogists and history enthusiasts alike.  From local happenings to global events, we'll uncover the stories that shaped the lives of our ancestors, providing valuable insights for those on a quest to discover their roots.  So, grab your magnifying glass and step into the past as we unravel the August 26 historical headlines that may hold the missing pieces of your family's history puzzle.

        On August 26, 1660, Louis XIV made a triumphal entry into Paris with his wife, Marie-Therese. The royal couple took their places...


        Louis XIV wasn't just a ceremonial king who represents the kingdom, but makes no decisions of his own... His regime was considered an absolute monarchy, and Louis XIV was the sole master. No opposition force or elected chamber could stand in his way or challenge his decision.

        But he was in no way a capricious tyrant who arbitrarily terrorized defenseless subjects. Convinced of the greatness of France, then the dominant power on the international scene, the Sun King respected inherited... Read MORE...

        History of Quebec for Dummies by Eric Bedard, published by John Wiley & Sons, Canada, Ltd.
        August 26, 1660
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        Hunt and Adams
        Des Moines, Iowa

        Visit Des Moines, Iowa, USA!

        Pittsfield, Maine, USA

        1906 - JEROME IN TRAIN WRECK ON MAINE RAILROAD. Escapes with R. Fulton Cutting, Judge Crane, and W. G. Hooke. MAN KILLED, THREE HURT.


        Knickerbocker Limited, Bound for Bar Harbor, In Collision with Runaway Freight Car.

        PITTSFIELD, Ma., Aug. 25. - One man was killed and three others slightly injured to-day in a collision between a runaway freight car and the Knickerbocker Limited, bound from New York to Bar Harbor, on the Maine Central Railroad. The victim was Louis A. Gilbert of Bangor, a traveling engineer employed by the road. The injured men were train hands.

        A number of prominent New York people were passengers on... Read MORE...

        The New York Times -  New York, New York -  August 26, 1906
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        1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes



        How To Fry Quick Doughnuts

        Put a frying kettle half full of fat over the fire to heat.

        Shift together one pound of flour, one teaspoonful each of salt and bicarbonate of soda, and half a saltspoon full of grated nutmeg.

        Beat half a pound of ...Read MORE...



        March 17, 1885 Daily Missoulian
        Belfast, Maine, USA

        1873 - GREAT FIRE AT BELFAST, MAINE. AMOUNT OF THE LOSSES AND INSURANCE. AID FOR THE SUFFERERS TENDERED.


        Belfast, Me., Aug. 25.
        MISS REDEMPORT, aged eighty, perished in the Frothingham House destroyed in the conflagration

        yesterday. The Bangor boat this morning brought a large supply of provisions sent by the citizens of that place for sufferers by the fire. The total loss and the insurance is not yet ascertained.
        Among the heaviest losers by the fire are the following:
        N. Harden, storehouses, losses $25,000, insurance $15,000.
        R. Sibley, buildings, molasses and sugar, loss $50,000,... Read MORE...

        Sandusky Daily Register -  Sandusky, Ohio -  August 26, 1873
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        G. Stammann
        One Price Clothing House
        Custom Clothes a Specialty
        62 & 64 Michigan Ave., Detroit, Mich.

        Visit Detroit, Michigan, USA!

        Denver, Colorado, USA

        1887 - PLUNGED THROUGH THE BRIDGE.


        Denver, Col., Aug. 25. - An accident occurred on an east-bound Union Pacific express at Sand Creek bridge, 10 miles east of here, last night, resulting in the death of Engineer MASTERTON and the serious wounding of two or three trainmen. The Union Pacific and Burlington bridges across this Sand Creek, almost parallel, and within a few feet of each other. When the engineer of the Union Pacific train, which leaves here about 30 minutes ahead of the Burlington train, was withing a few feet of the... Read MORE...

        The New York Times -  New York, New York -  August 26, 1887
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        Chelsea, Massachusetts, USA (Romney's Marsh)

        1908 - WALL KILLS EIGHT. COLLAPSES, CRUSHING WORKMEN, AT CHELSEA, MASS. - 20 MORE INJURED.


        Chelsea, Mass., Aug. 25. - A brick wall forty-five feet high collapsed today in Chelsea Square, burying beneath it some thirty workmen. Eight were killed outright or died in ambulances on the way to hospitals. Twenty others were injured, eleven of whom were taken to hospitals in a serious condition.
        Those killed were:
        MEYER ARTWOK, of Chelsea.
        FERRI SANTE, of Boston.
        FELECHI GENELIFA, of Boston.
        MORRIS ZACHLAD, of New York.
        JOSEPH ADLER, of Malden.
        JOHN COSTELLO, of Lynn.
        CARMELLO... Read MORE...

        New York Tribune -  New York, New York -  August 26, 1908
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        1800s Advice and Etiquette for Ladies



        A dark and dingy kitchen is very detrimental to the health of a household, for cleanliness can hardly be expected to prevail when the light of day does not frequently penetrate. Every housekeeper ought regularly to visit her servants' surroundings,...Read MORE...



        Advice for Ladies - The Southbridge Journal, Southbridge, Massachusetts, December 25, 1885
        Saratoga, New York, USA (Schuylerville) (Victory)

        1902 BROOKLYN GIRLS' INJURY.


        FANNIE AND MARY BIDEN SERIOUSLY HURT BY A RUNAWAY AT SARATOGA.

        Special to The New York Times.

        Saratoga, N.Y., Aug. 25. - MISS FANNIE BIDEN of 871 Union Street, Brooklyn, who for several weeks has been a guest at Congress Hall, was probably fatally injured on South Broadway, near Circular Street, this morning.

        Accompanied by her sister, MISS MARY BIDEN, with whom she was walking, she started to cross the street, when both were knocked down and run over by a runaway horse.

        They were... Read MORE...

        The New York Times -  New York, New York -  August 26, 1902
        Comments


        Concord, New Hampshire, USA

        1896 - SEVERAL PASSENGERS INJURED - And Three May Die as the Result of a Railroad Accident.


        CONCORD, N. H., Aug. 27. - The down express on the Concord Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad due here at 2:28 P. M. left the rails on account of a defective switch near Ferry Street, throwing several cars from the track and injuring several passengers. An ambulance with a corps of physicians has gone to the scene of the wreck.

        The train was heavily loaded, many of the passengers being on their way from the veteran's reunion at the Weirs. The speed of the train was moderate, and the... Read MORE...

        The New York Times -  New York, New York -  August 26, 1896
        Comments


        1880  August 26 — Competing circus owners P. T. Barnum and James A. Bailey sign a contract in Bridgeport, Connecticut to create the Barnum & Bailey Circus.

        wikipedia.org

        Visit Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA!

        1904  IN ST. LOUIS. Tornado Kills Two and Injures Many — Heavy Property Loss.
        St. Louis, Aug. 20.— A tornado of small proportions but of extreme fury, swept down upon the residence portion of North St. Louis Friday, resulting in the death of two persons, injury to probably 50 and damage to property estimated at $100,000. Venice, Ill., Aug. 20—The tornado that swept across the river from North St. Louis late Friday killed Mrs. Margaret Beal here, injured ten others and caused considerable damage to property.

        Waconia Patriot
        Waconia, Minnesota

        Visit St Louis, Missouri, USA!

        1748  August 26 - The first Lutheran denomination in North America, the Pennsylvania Ministerium, is founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

        historyorb.com

        Visit Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA!

        1869  Seal Steals Man's Clothing
        A young man lately went in bathing at Lotbiniere, province of Quebec, placing his clothes upon what he supposed was a stone. It turned out to be a seal basking in the sun, which was thus disturbed, and made for the water, with the young man's clothing.

        New Hampshire Sentinel
        New Hampshire

        Visit Lotbinière, Québec, Canada (Saint-Louis)!

        1910  BIG CYCLONE RUINS CROPS
        Michigan Section Storm Swept, and Creek Overflows, Flooding Houses. GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Aug. 25. - A storm of cyclone proportions raged today north of Grand Rapids and crops, standing, timber and many buildings were ruined. The terrific wind was accompanied by a heavy rain. Asylum Creek at Traverse City overflowed, flooding a number of residences.

        Morning Oregonian
        Portland, Oregon

        Visit Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA!

        1868  Derailed Train for Fun
        The man who placed the rails on the Shore Line Railroad, on the 15th inst., which resulted in throwing the engine off the track at Stony Creek Bridge, has been caught. He turns out to be a wandering, shoeless vagrant, who says that he put the rails on the track for fun, and waited in the bushes nearby to see the result. His name is William Warner, and he belongs in Warwick, Rhode Island.
        genealogybank.com
        Plain Dealer
        Ohio

        Visit Warwick, Rhode Island, USA (Hillsgrove) (Pontiac) (Apponaug) (Warwick Neck) (Nausauket)!

         

        America - Did you know?

         March 3, 1931 - The Star-Spangled Banner is adopted as the national anthem.

         

        Quebec - Did you know?

         The Canadian horse was introduced to New France in July of 1665. The first load of twelve horses was sent by King Louis XIV... From 1665 to 1793, the horse population in New France grew from 12 to 14,000 animals... For almost one hundred years, the...Read MORE...



        The Story of the Canadian Horse (www.lechevalcanadien.ca/ breed.htm)
         

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        Visit Chester, New Hampshire, USA!

        Discover the people who lived there, the places they visited and the stories they shared.


        Chester Inn

        C. R. Ferguson & Son,
        Dealers in Furniture and Furnishing Undertakers,
        Dover, Delaware

        Visit Dover, Delaware, USA!

        Died August 26



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        October 6 News - 1892 - Germans not welcome

        Welcome to our blog, where we embark on a captivating journey through time, exploring the rich tapestry of history and genealogy.  In this edition, we'll delve into the treasure trove of historical news articles dated October 6, unearthing stories that resonate with genealogists and history enthusiasts alike.  From local happenings to global events, we'll uncover the stories that shaped the lives of our ancestors, providing valuable insights for those on a quest to discover their roots.  So, grab your magnifying glass and step into the past as we unravel the October 6 historical headlines that may hold the missing pieces of your family's history puzzle.

          Washing and Drying the Hair

          National Labor Tribune
          Pennsylvania
          February 1, 1900

          Visit , United States (USA) (American Colonies)!

          Ware, Massachusetts, USA

          1848 - GREAT FIRE IN WARE.


          We learn from a correspondent of the Worcester Telegraph that the most destructive fire that has ever occurred in Ware Village, visited that place on Tuesday morning. Three blocks of stores situated in the central part of the village, were entirely destroyed, and several other stores were much injured, the fire was first discovered in the store of J. P. Gale, which rapidly communicated to the other buildings, and this between the hours of 1 and 3 o'clock, in the midst of torrents of rain which... Read MORE...

          Barre Patriot -  Barre, Massachusetts -  October 6, 1848
          Comments


          1838  Stage Accident
          The Albany mail stage from Greenfield, N. Y. was precipitated into the Green river, on Thursday last, by the bridge giving way. The passengers, fortunately escaped without injury, but the driver was severely hurt.

          The Sun
          Baltimore, Maryland

          Visit Greenfield, Saratoga, New York, USA!

          1892  Train Crashes into Wagon
          A south-bound express on the Housatonic Railroad crashed into a wagon belonging to Capt. J. S. Barnes of Lenox at Lee, Mass., yesterday afternoon, instantly killing the occupants of the wagon. Capt. Barne's coachman and Jerry Donovan, and both horses.

          The New York Times
          New York, New York

          Visit Lee, Massachusetts, USA!

          1892  Germans not welcome
          The Canadian town of Longueuil, it is announced has decided to prohibit any one speaking German from landing there, and keeps a fire-engine on duty to play hot water on any such intruder.

          Times-Picayune
          Louisiana

          Visit Longueuil, Québec, Canada (Saint-Antoine-de-Longueuil)!

           

          America - Did you know?

           December 2, 1899 - U.S. acquires American Samoa by treaty with Great Britain and Germany.

           

          Quebec - Did you know?

           The seigneurial system was a form of land settlement modelled on the French feudal system. It began in New France in 1627 with the formation of the Compagnie des Cent-Associés that was initially responsible for handing out land grants and...Read MORE...



          richardjohnbr.blogspot.com/ 2010/ 10/ seigneurial-system-and-settlement.html
           

          Picture of the Day



          Visit North Reading, Massachusetts, USA!

          Discover the people who lived there, the places they visited and the stories they shared.


          First Baptist Church

          Delicious Bromose
          The New Nut Food
          A Perfect Food for Children

          Sanitas Nut Food Co., Battle Creek, Mich.

          The Ladies' Home Journal
          March 1898

          Visit Battle Creek, Michigan, USA!

          Died October 6



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          June 7 News - 1902 - Find those old family bibles!

          Welcome to our blog, where we embark on a captivating journey through time, exploring the rich tapestry of history and genealogy.  In this edition, we'll delve into the treasure trove of historical news articles dated June 7, unearthing stories that resonate with genealogists and history enthusiasts alike.  From local happenings to global events, we'll uncover the stories that shaped the lives of our ancestors, providing valuable insights for those on a quest to discover their roots.  So, grab your magnifying glass and step into the past as we unravel the June 7 historical headlines that may hold the missing pieces of your family's history puzzle.

            Genton Clothes
            Main at Pitkin St.
            East Hartford, Conn.

            Riverdale Road
            West Springfield, Mass.

            Visit West Springfield, Massachusetts, USA!

            Thomaston, Maine, USA

            1915 - FIRE SWEEPS MAINE TOWN


            Burns Thomaston's Only Hotel--Incendiaries Suspected.

            THOMASTON, Me., June 6. - The Knox House, the only hotel here, the Watts Block, owned by the town, a livery stable and a mercantile block containing four stores were burned early today. The loss is approximately $100,000, more than half of which is covered by insurance. W. L. Catland, owner of the stable where the fire began, believes that it was set on fire, and the authorities are investigating a report that several men were seen... Read MORE...

            The New York Times -  New York, New York -  June 7, 1915
            Comments


             

            1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes



            Cream of Spinach Soup - This is one of the very palatable and slightly green soups. Pick the leaves from two quarts of spinach; wash; throw them into a hot kettle, and shake and toss for five minutes. Drain them, saving the very small amount...Read MORE...



            The Ladies' Home Journal, June 1898

            1908 - First Model-T car is produced by Henry Ford (United States)


            FORD FACTORY CLEVERNESS
            The Ford Motor Company from now until July will manufacture in quantities only the four-cylinder Rumble Seat Runabout, Model "S," and the six-cylinder Runabout Model K. By cutting down the variety of models their factory can put its best energy toward bringing out the Model "T" Touring Car and Taxicab on schedule time. The Model "T" four-cylinder Touring Car will be ready for delivery in July, and the Brooklyn distributers, Bishop, McCormick & Bishop, Inc. of 20 Halsey ... Read MORE...

            The Brooklyn Daily Eagle -  Brooklyn, New York -  June 7, 1908
            Comments



            Have you protected the finish on your Packard?
            Packard Louisville Motor Company, Incorporated
            Broadway at Campbell

            Visit Louisville, Kentucky, USA!

            Cleveland, Ohio, USA

            1902 - A Massachusetts Man's Big Luck - Gate Tender on a Railroad to Get a Large Slice.


            The Times Special Service.
            WORCESTER, Mass., Saturday, June 7. - Family records expected daily from the parish priest at Lanoraie in Quebec are expected to establish the claim of Joseph A. Demars, a gate tender of the Boston & Albany Railroad to a share of the $8,000,000 which has been in possession of the city authorities of Cleveland, O., since 1864.

            Mr. and Mrs. Demars, in case they are able to prove their claim, will have to share the fortune with the families of Mrs. Loiuse Caisse,... Read MORE...

            Seattle Daily Times -  Seattle, Washington -  June 7, 1902
            Comments


             

            1800s Advice and Etiquette for Men



            Upon all occasions avoid speaking of yourself, if it be possible. Some abruptly speak advantageously of themselves, without either pretence or provocation. This is downright...Read MORE...



            Practical Morality, Or, A Guide to Men and Manners... (1813). United Kingdom: J. Walker.
            1904 1904
            Mrs. Walter Davis of Lisbon Falls was in Lewiston yesterday.

            The Lewiston Daily Sun
            Lewiston, Maine

            1942  June 4–June 7 – WWII: The Battle of Midway: The Japanese naval advance in the Pacific is halted.

            Naval History and Heritage Command (www.youtube.com)

            Visit , United States (USA) (American Colonies)!

            1972  June 7 - Richmond VA experienced its worst flood of record as rains from Hurricane Agnes pushed the water level at the city locks to a height of 36.5 feet, easily topping the previous record of thirty feet set in 1771.

            The Weather Channel

            Visit Richmond, Virginia, USA!

            1816  June 7 - A famous June snow occurred in the northeastern U.S. Danville VT reported drifts of snow and sleet twenty inches deep. The Highlands were white all day, and flurries were observed as far south as Boston MA.

            WeatherForYou.com

            Visit Danville, Vermont, USA (West Danville)!

            1889  THE SEATTLE FIRE. NEARLY ALL OF THE BUSINESS PORTION IN ASHES. SEATTLE IN ASHES.
            Seattle, June 7. - The city is a scene of wreck and ruins. Yesterday afternoon the entire business portion of the city was burned to the ground, and, for the lack of a proper supply of water and assistance, the place has suffered a loss of nearly $10,000,000 worth of property.

            The people have joined with the militia in protecting property from a gang of thieves. Relief committees are supplying coffee and food to the homeless at the Armory, and are furnishing beds as much as...
            Read MORE...


            Reno Evening Gazette
            Reno, Nevada

            Visit Seattle, Washington, USA!

            1923  BRAKEMAN FALLS TO HIS DEATH IN CANAAN, CONN.
            CANAAN, Conn. June 6 - Nicholas Mathias, 30, a brakeman on the Central New England railroad was killed today on a siding near the Connecticut Lime Co plant. He was climbing to the roof of a box car when he fell under the wheels. He leaves a wife and a child.

            The Bridgeport Telegram
            Bridgeport, Connecticut

            Visit Canaan, Connecticut, USA (Falls Village)!

             

            America - Did you know?

             The Library of Congress is keeping an archive of every tweet ever tweeted.

             

            Quebec - Did you know?

             To beckon a waiter in Quebec, quietly to say "Monsieur" or "S'il vous plait. Say "Mademoiselle" to beckon a waitress. Never beckon a waiter or waitress by snapping your fingers or shouting.
             

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            Sherbrooke, Que., Manege Militaire (Armoury)

            D. C. Browne Pure Milk & Cream
            Phone 4508-3
            Wolcott, Conn.

            Visit Wolcott, Connecticut, USA (Farmingbury)!

            Died June 7



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            Sunday, November 7, 2010

            November 24 News - Parents of 23 Have Ten Children!

            Welcome to our blog, where we embark on a captivating journey through time, exploring the rich tapestry of history and genealogy.  In this edition, we'll delve into the treasure trove of historical news articles dated November 24, unearthing stories that resonate with genealogists and history enthusiasts alike.  From local happenings to global events, we'll uncover the stories that shaped the lives of our ancestors, providing valuable insights for those on a quest to discover their roots.  So, grab your magnifying glass and step into the past as we unravel the November 24 historical headlines that may hold the missing pieces of your family's history puzzle.

              "1847 Rogers Bros."
              The Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden, Conn.

              The Ladies' Home Journal
              March 1898

              The Meriden Britannia Company was formed in 1852 in Meriden, Connecticut, as a manufacturing company focused on producing wares in britannia metal. It became, for a time, the largest silverware company in the world. wikipedia

              Visit Meriden, Connecticut, USA!

              Peterborough, New Hampshire, USA

              1875 - THE PETERBOROUGH FIRE


              A Journal dispatch gives the particulars of the disastrous fire at Peterborough, by which the machine shop of Granville P. Felt with the storehouse connected therewith, were entirely consumed at 1 o'clock on Wednesday morning. It appears that the fire was discovered by Mr. Felt at 5 minutes before 11 o'clock on Tuesday night, and had made such headway that he was unable to start his force-pump, but gave the alarm and directed his energies to saving his books and papers, in which he succeeded.... Read MORE...

              The New Hampshire Patriot -  Concord, New Hampshire -  November 24, 1875
              Comments


               

              1800s Cooking Tips and Recipes



              Cream of Artichoke Soup - Take four medium-sized fresh artichokes; wash, boil until tender, and remove the skins; chop the artichokes very fine, then mash them through a colander. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a saucepan; add one...Read MORE...



              The Ladies' Home Journal, June 1898

              Patton's Sun-Proof Paint

              Jas. E. Patton Co., Milwaukee, Wis., U.S.A.

              Ladies' Home Journal
              February 1898

              Visit Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA!

              Jamestown, New York, USA

              1891 - A FATAL HOTEL FIRE. THREE WOMEN AND A LITTLE BOY BURNED TO DEATH.


              Jamestown, N. Y., Nov. 23 - Three women and a boy were burned to death between 1 and 2 o'clock this morning in a fire which gutted the Old Homestead Hotel, at Third and Pine Streets. They were MRS. BUCHANAN, pastry cook, aged fifty; her son, aged seven; MRS. CARRIE MARSH, dishwasher, and MAGGIE WILSON, aged nineteen, waitress. Other servants and boarders escaped in their night clothes.

              Those women occupied a room on the third floor. GRACE HARTWELL, whose mother lives in Buffalo, tells the... Read MORE...

              The New York Times -  New York, New York -  November 24, 1891
              Comments


              Manchester, New Hampshire, USA

              1858 - TERRIBLE RAILROAD ACCIDENT.


              We stop the press to announce a frightful accident that occurred near this city, on the Central Railroad, about 1 - o'clock this afternoon, on Drew & Hopkins gravel train.

              JOHN G GOTHAM, a young man in this city had been had been up on the gravel train a little ways to see about getting work. The gravel train was going, and he and two others were in the rear dump car, and behind it was a car of tools. The pin was pulled to leave the tool car, when the train was in motion, and when taken out... Read MORE...

              New Hampshire Patriot & State Gazette -  Concord, New Hampshire -  November 24, 1858
              Comments


               

              1800s Advice and Etiquette for Ladies



              GLEANINGS

              There is a qualitative test for butter so simple that any housewife can put it into successful practice. A clean piece of white paper is smeared with a little of the suspected butter. The paper is then rolled up and set on fire. If the...Read MORE...



              Advice for Ladies - The Southbridge Journal, Southbridge, Massachusetts, December 25, 1885
              Toronto, Ontario, Canada (York)

              1872 - WRECK OF THE ROBERT LOWE


              CONFIRMATION OF THE SAD RUMOR — EIGHTEEN LIVES LOST.

              TORONTO, Nov. 23 — The following particulars have been received regarding the Anglo-American cable steamer Robert Lowe from the surviving officers: After connecting Lamanche and Placentiatown by cable, the steamer left the latter port at 4 P. M., on the 19th, bound for St. Johns. At 4 A. M., on the 20th the weather thick and the wind h igh, the ship struck heavily near St. Shotts, and in a very few minutes filled and settled down so fast... Read MORE...

              New York Times -  New York, New York -  November 24, 1872
              Comments


              1890  Suicide of a Canterbury Man
              WILLIMANTIC, Conn., Nov. 24 - The body of John Tracey of Canterbury was found in the woods about a mile from his home yesterday. The man's throat was cut from ear to ear, and his razor found near the body indicated that he had committed suicide. Tracey has been missing from his home for a week, and his relatives have searched all over the county for him. It is supposed that he committed the deed in a fit of temporary insanity.

              The New Haven Evening Register
              New Haven, Connecticut

              Visit Canterbury, Connecticut, USA!

              1880  A novel way of catching a swarm of bees was unintentionally tried at Decatur, Michigan, the other day by a young man, who is not likely to repeat the experiment if he can help it.
              He ran toward the swarm with a green bush in his hand, over which the queen bee poised and then alighted upon his hat. In a twinkling the others followed and completely covered him being so closely knit together that he could scarcely breathe. A box procured, the man's head stuck into it and the swarm finally worked off and hived.

              Indiana Weekly Messenger
              Indiana, Pennsylvania

              Visit Decatur, Michigan, USA!

              1949  November 24 – The ski resort in Squaw Valley, California officially opens.

              wikipedia.org

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              1917  November 24 – In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 9 members of the Milwaukee Police Department are killed by a bomb

              wikipedia.org

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              1888  On the 19th Mrs. Elizabeth Worth White, of Newburyport, Mass., celebrated her one hundredth birthday.


              St Joseph Herald
              Saint Joseph, Michigan

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              1910  Signed "Wife"
              Up in Sutton, Massachusetts, a young woman organist wrote a preacher and signed herself "wife." And the organist's play-ful ways caused the deuce of a domestic discord.

              The Wilmington Dispatch
              Wilmington, North Carolina

              Visit Sutton, Massachusetts, USA!

              1888  Schooners Fast in the Ice
              AUGUSTA, Me., Nov. 24. - The Kennebec river closed to navigation Thursday night, ten days earlier than usual. It is solidly frozen over between Gardiner and Brown's Island. There are seven schooners caught in the ice between this city and Gardiner.

              The Daily City News
              New Castle, Pennsylvania

              Visit Augusta, Maine, USA!

              1888  America for Americans
              BROOKLYN, N. Y., Nov. 24 - "Deacon" Richardson has given notice that hereafter only American citizens, native or naturalized, will be employed on his street car lines as conductors or drivers.

              The Daily City News
              New Castle, Pennsylvania

              Visit Brooklyn, New York, USA (Flatlands) (Flatbush) (Coney Island)!

              1888  Railroad Ticket Office Burglarized
              BIDDEFORD, Me., Nov. 24. - Thursday night burglars broke into the Boston & Maine railroad ticket office at Pine Point, blew open the safe and secured the week's wages of the station men and section hands. The agent admits that the loss is considerable, but declines to state the amount. The explosion shattered the windows and demolished the partitions.

              The Daily City News
              New Castle, Pennsylvania

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              1845  A Horrible Death
              We learn from the Worcester (Mass.) Transcript, that Mr. ASA MASON, manufacturer of tacks and brads, while adjusting his machinery, was caught by the skirts of his coat by the belt, and drawn up backwards over the shaft, between which and the ceiling there was only a space of 18 inches and was thrown round upwards of 100 times before the machinery could be stopped. His back was probably broken the first revolution. He died in a few moments. Mr. MASON was between 50 and 60 years of age.

              Louisville Morning Courier and American Democrat
              Louisville, Kentucky

              Visit Worcester, Massachusetts, USA!

              1910  Parents of 23 Have Ten Children
              New York Tribune. Race suicide is not fashionable in Batiscan, a small town in the Province of Quebec. Edouard Jolicoeur, of Batiscan reached Montreal a few days ago with his wife and 10 children. The number is fairly large, but the fact that they are five pairs of twins and the parents are only 23 years old is stranger still.

              Oregonian
              Oregon

              Visit Batiscan, Québec, Canada (Sainte-Geneviève-de-Batiscan) (Saint-François-Xavier)!

              1875  Accident.
              On Tuesday last Mr. Harry Bartlett was loading a heavy trunk upon his baggage express wagon, when, by a little start of the horse, the trunk fell back, striking him upon the shoulder and dislocating a joint. The injury received surgical treatment and he is now doing well.

              The New Hampshire Patriot
              Concord, New Hampshire

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              1875  Fatal Accident.
              EDWARD McCRAW, foreman of a gang in the Little Tunnel at North Adams, Mass., was crushed to death on Thursday night while shackling corn.

              The New Hampshire Patriot
              Concord, New Hampshire

              Visit North Adams, Massachusetts, USA!

              1937  Law suits settled
              Superior Court Two suits brought by Mrs. Margaret E. Feige of Milford against Elsie Brown of Winchendon in action of tort following an automobile accident June 29, 1936 in Milford, were settled out of court. The addamnum in the writ for personal injury was $5000.

              Fitchburg Sentinel
              Fitchburg, Massachusetts

               

              America - Did you know?

               George Washington was a savvy businessman who owned one of the largest distilleries in 18th century America, and by 1799 alone, he was producing 11,000 gallons of whiskey.

               

              Quebec - Did you know?

               Eating while walking or standing on the street in Quebec is considered bad form.
               

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              Visit Athens, Maine, USA!

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              Street View, Athens, Me.

              Who has the Oldest Sewing Machine?
              A new "Singer" given in exchange for it

              The Singer Manufacturing Co.
              New York City

              Ladies' Home Journal
              February 1898

              Visit Manhattan, New York, USA (New York City) (New Amsterdam) (Washington Heights)!

              Died November 24



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